1: Payment Providers are Helping Problem Gamblers – Keith Whyte from the NCPG

Identifying problem gamblers through technology and risk patterns

Keith S. Whyte became the Executive Director of the National Council on Problem Gambling (NCPG) in October 1998.  NCPG is the national advocate for programs and services to assist problem gamblers and their families.  NCPG was founded in 1972 and is the oldest and most objective organization on gambling issues.
Previously, Mr. Whyte served as Director of Research for the American Gaming Association where he was responsible for research and public policy issues, including problem gambling.  His prior experience includes the American Bar Association’s Section of Individual Rights and Responsibilities where he dealt with policy issues relating to civil rights, human rights, healthcare, and immigration law.  He began his career working on healthcare policy in the office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Keith graduated from Hampden-Sydney College with a Bachelor of Arts in History and a Certificate in International Relations.  He also studied at Leiden University, the Netherlands.
Topics discussed in this episode:

  • Stance of neutrality
  • Minimizing harm for anyone with a gambling problem while allowing Operators and vendors to maximize revenue
  • Programs and policies in place to reduce harm
  • How to get the word out to those who may have a gambling problem or who have a severe problem
  • Crafting messages
  • Identifying problem gamblers through technology and risk patterns
  • Payments providers allowing gamblers to exclude themselves
  • The payment provider as a tool to help develop identifying algorithms
  • Gambling addiction is a disease; the goal is prevention
  • Sports betting and responsible gaming
  • Shame and stigma
  • Gambling is not a problem for 98% of those who gamble
  • Warning signs of being unable to set and stick to limits of time and money gambling
  • Excessive gambling can deaden certain segments of the brain
  • How do people get help?
  • Predicting a gambling addiction
  • Severe problem gamblers start betting for money at ages 10 – 12
  • It is preventable and treatable
  • Vendors and operators must be ahead of the curve

NOTES

National Council on Problem Gambling

Keith Whyte